PPSN Symposium: Experts Advocate Multispecies Control for Co-infections

PPSN Symposium: Experts Advocate Multispecies Control for Co-infections

 
PPSN Symposium: Experts Advocate Multispecies Control for Co-infections

Group photograph of participants at the one-day Parasitology and Public health Society of Nigeria (PPSN) Symposium

The need for multispecies control approach in the management of the menace of co-infections, particularly as it affects Nigerians was said to be inevitable and cost effective.

This came to the fore at the recently concluded one-day Parasitology and Public health Society of Nigeria (PPSN) Symposium hosted by the Covenant University Biotechnology Centre.

Speaking on “Co-infection and Morbidity”, the Symposium Lecturer, Professor Olubunmi Otubanjo, examined the current understanding of synergism and antagonism among pathogens causing common co-infections in Sub-Saharan Africa as well as the impact of co-infection, particularly in the context of what he called Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) that are prevalent in many low and middle-income Sub-Sahara African countries.

Otubanjo, who is also the Head of Zoology Department, University of Lagos, called for the need to establish co-infection data and African problems to be solved by Africans.

The symposium, which doubled as the second zonal meeting of the PPSN Southwest, was facilitated by the Chair, Biotechnology Centre, Covenant University, Professor Louis Egwari; PPSN Southwest Zonal Coordinator, Professor Uwem Ekpo and the Editor-in-Chief, Nigerian Journal of Parasitology, Professor Sammy Sam-Wobo.

A total of 84 members of the Society from 10 tertiary institutions and organisations as well as eight partners participated in the one-day event. They included Covenant University; University of Lagos; Federal University of Agriculture, Abeokuta; University of Ibadan; Ogun State Institute of Health Technology; Olabisi Onabanjo University; Delta State University; Crawford University; Abraham Adesanya Polytechnic and Ogun State College of Health among others.